Faculty/Staff News

Dr. Madhuri Desai
Apr 2019
Madhuri Desai, Associate Professor of Art History and Asian studies won the Hitchcock Book Award for "Banaras Reconstructed: Architecture and Sacred Space in a Hindu City." The Alice Davis Hitchcock Book Award, established in 1949, by the Society of Architectural Historians, annually recognizes "the most distinguished work of scholarship in the history of architecture published by a North American scholar." https://artsandarchitecture.psu.edu/news/desai-wins-prestigious-art-history-book-award  
Daniel Zolli
Apr 2019
Drs. Sarah Rich and Daniel Zolli will lead a workshop, and present their research—on cobalt and cosmetics respectively—at Princeton University's Center for European Cultural Studies on Friday, May 3.
Elizabeth Mansfield
Apr 2019
Elizabeth Mansfield, Head, Department of Art History Friday, April 26 - 12:10 p.m. Join us on Friday afternoons at 12:10 p.m. for interesting, enlightening gallery talks on current exhibitions and selected works from the permanent collection. Gallery talks for Pop Up Exhibitions are held in the Print Study Room.  
Photo: Dr. Dewey attending the installation of a new chief in Swaziland
Apr 2019
NPR describes mythic role of iron in "Striking Iron: The Art of African Blacksmiths," co-created by Bill Dewey exhibited at the National Museum of African Art in Washington, D.C. https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2019/04/21/715117637/the-beauty-and-the-power-of-african-blacksmiths  
Photo: Dr. Dewey attending the installation of a new chief in Swaziland
Apr 2019
    The highly reviewed exhibit "Striking Iron: The Art of African Blacksmiths" co-curated by Dr. Bill Dewey opened at the National Museum of African Art in Washington, DC  on April 17, 2019 – October 20, 2019. https://www.si.edu/exhibitions/striking-iron-art-african-blacksmiths-eve...  
Dr. Zabel with his recent Ph.D. graduates, Dr. Laura Sivert, Dr. Kelema Moses, Dr. Tina Swisher, and Dr. Gretta Tritch Roman
Apr 2019
   Craig Zabel, associate professor of art history, presents "The History of the Slide" Thursday, April 11 at noon, a nostalgic look at the art history of old, Thursday, April 11 at noon in the Borland Project Space at the "Imaging Art History" interactive installation on display April 9-19.
Apr 2019
Carolyn Lucarelli, Visual Resources Curator, presented in a session titled "The Digital Scholarship Pivot: Case Studies in Using VR Skills to Expand Your Professional Reach," at the Visual Resources Association annual conference in Los Angeles, California, on March 28, 2019. Her talk provided an overview of her efforts to transition the VRC into a Digital Art History space. */           */
Ethan Robey, Associate Teaching Professor of Art History
Apr 2019
GALLERY TALK: From the Rooftops: John Sloan and the Art of a New Urban Space by Ethan Robey, Associate Teaching Professor of Art History, Friday, April 5th, 12:10 p.m.
Dr. Sarah K. Rich
Apr 2019
Six faculty members receive 2019 Atherton Award for Excellence in Teaching   67     April 02, 2019 UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Six Penn State faculty members have received the 2019 George W. Atherton Award for Excellence in Teaching. They are: Andrew Baxter, associate teaching professor in the Eberly College of Science; Jacqueline Bortiatynski, associate teaching professor in the Eberly College of Science; Liliana Naydan, assistant professor of English at Penn State Abington; Sarah K. Rich, associate professor in the College of Arts and Architecture; John Roth, professor of engineering at Penn State Erie, The Behrend College; and Jennifer Zosh, associate professor of human development and family studies at Penn State Brandywine. The award, named after Penn State’s seventh president, honors excellence in teaching at the undergraduate level. Sarah K. Rich Sarah Rich presents the copper reactions to her seminar following an experiment. IMAGE: STEPHANIE SWINDLE Rich, who teaches art history, said she gave her first lecture in fifth grade and was hooked ever since. Speaking to her then peers, using diagrams and dialog, she discussed the physiology and domestic habits of hobbits. These days, the J.R.R Tolkien fan says she’s more interested in abstract paintings of the Cold War than the inhabitants of Middle Earth, but that she’s still happiest in the classroom. Her creative ways to teach art history include sending students on scavenger hunts for objects related to the topic at hand or creating pigments from 15th-century recipes. While teaching about historic architecture, she invites students to look at campus buildings inspired by different periods. Rich said a teacher’s first task — especially in undergraduate level courses — is to convey the pleasure of learning about the course material. She shows them that a life steered by curiosity leads to adventure and a more productive connection with the world. “Teaching, especially in the humanities, should demonstrate a way of looking at the world that is directed by questions, rather than by easy answers, and it should encourage a mode of dwelling that is steeped in wonder, rather than fear of the unknown,” Rich said. Students praised both Rich’s innovative teaching methods and her interesting course topics such as one focusing on art and money. “She addresses current issues of valuing artwork, commerce in the related financial realities of the art world,” a student said. “She invited guest speakers on philanthropy and fundraising and she was forthright about the challenges of commercializing art. I have studied art and art history throughout high school and college and I have never even considered the topics that Dr. Rich presented during that class.” Colleagues also praised her unique approaches to teaching and her courses. “Dr. Rich is best known in our college by her undergraduate art criticism courses like “Taste and Criticism” and “Art Since You Were Born” or her newly minted interdomain course that combines subject matter from outside fields,” a colleague said. “In the criticism courses she is very skilled in setting up topics for debate, providing room for all the students, including more reticent students to actively contribute.”        

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