2009

Dec 2009
Ashley Williams, M.A. candidate in art history, has been awarded a Study Grant to participate in “The Ivories of Amalfi/Salerno and the Medieval Mediterranean,” an International Workshop, Amalfi, Italy, 10-13 December 2009.
Oct 2009
Kelema Lee Moses, Ph.D. candidate in art history, presented a paper, “Contestation in the City: Architecture and the Critique of American Presence in Honolulu,” at Peripheral Visions: Colonization, Resistance, Representation, USC’s 13th Annual “Expanding the Visual Field” Graduate Student Symposium, The Getty Center, Los Angeles, October 3, 2009.
Oct 2009
Melissa Mednicov, Ph.D. candidate in art history, presented a paper, “An Islamic City in Europe?  Parisian Urbanism Redefined,” at Incongruities, the 44th Annual UCLA Art History Graduate Student Association Symposium, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, October 23, 2009.
Oct 2009
Carmen McCann, Ph.D. candidate in art history, presented a paper, “More than Just an Allegory:  Life and Death in Eugène Delacroix’s Greece on the Ruins of Missolonghi,” at the Florida State University 27th Annual Symposium  for Graduate Students in the History of Art, Tallahassee, Florida, October 23-24, 2009.
Oct 2009
Kimberly Parsons, Ph.D. candidate in art history, presented a paper, “The Mysterious Death of Sienese Art:  Misguided Perceptions of Domenico Beccafumi,” at the Southeastern College Art Conference, held at the University of South Alabama, Mobile, October 22-24, 2009.
Oct 2009
Pierette Kulpa, Ph.D.  candidate in art history, presented a paper, “The Anatomy of the Miraculous:  Depictions of Miraculous Healing in Sixteenth-Century Venice,” at the Bodies and Boundaries: A Graduate Conference hosted by The Department of History and Religious Studies Program at The Pennsylvania State University, October 31, 2009, at the Days Inn Penn State.
Oct 2009
Cali Buckley, M.A.  candidate in art history, presented a paper, “Undead Anatomies: Dissection and Representation in Early Modern Europe,” at the Bodies and Boundaries: A Graduate Conference hosted by The Department of History and Religious Studies Program at The Pennsylvania State University, October 31, 2009, Days at the Days Inn Penn State.
Sep 2009
Ashley Williams is graduating from Penn State's Schreyer Honors College with a triple major in art history, French, and international studies. Among the many honors she has received are a Schreyer Ambassador Travel Grant (to photograph 12th-century Siculo-Arabic ivory boxes); the Parkinson Petracca French Department Travel Award; a Research Travel Grant from the Department of Art History; and a Schreyer 2007 President Sparks Award. Ashley was enrolled as an Italian student at Liceo Marconi in Milan during academic year 2004-05. That year she represented Italy in international ice-dancing competitions, after 12 years of competitive skating at the national and international levels. Her honors thesis presents original research on the context of Puvis de Chavannes' murals for the Boston Public Library; painted in France, these panels allegorize fields of academic knowledge, but they also-she argues-enact a myth of national identity. Fluent in French and d Italian, Ashley Williams plans to pursue a Ph.D. in art history with a specialization in Byzantine art.
Sep 2009
Katherine Kunkel is a Schreyer Honors College senior who is completing concurrent majors in art history and chemistry, as well as a minor in biology.  Her honors thesis research (under Dr. Charlotte Houghton) examines collecting patterns in the encyclopedic Wunderkammern of early modern Europe.  She has excelled academically, even taking graduate seminars.  Katherine has been selected as this year's class marshal for the Department of Art History.  Her many additional activities include participation in programs on tropical field ecology in Costa Rica and sustainable development in Bulgaria, two years as a member of a funded synthetic organic chemistry research team, and more than 300 hours as a volunteer Emergency Medical Technician.  Katherine plans a career in medicine, and will begin her graduate study this fall at the Medical School of the University of Pittsburgh.
Sep 2009
Kristin V. Dean holds a B.A. and M.A. in art history from the University of Oregon.  In 2006, Kristin entered the Ph.D. program at Penn State. Her primary fields of study have been 20th-century architecture, contemporary art, and global urbanism.  She has presented papers on her work at symposia held at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, University of Iowa, University of Oregon, and Penn State. She has also been a major force in the founding and development of the Graduate Student Association for Visual Culture at Penn State.  Kristin's dissertation, "Reshaping the Neoliberal City:  The Politics of Cooperation and the Movimiento de Ocupantes e Inquilinos" (advisor:  Craig Zabel) is exploring the Movement of Squatters and Tenants (founded 1988) in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Rather than focusing upon the celebrity architects that dazzle much of the contemporary architectural scene with trophy buildings, Kristin is examining a popular movement, driven by people with few means to establish decent and sustainable low-cost housing, be it new construction, revitalizing earlier buildings, or converting abandoned buildings into residences.  Kristin has been awarded the Waddell Biggart Graduate Fellowship from the Graduate School and a Department of Art History Dissertation Fellowship to support nearly a year of research in Argentina, where she is currently living.
Sep 2009
Edit Tóth, Ph.D. candidate in art history, presented a paper, " The Artistic Subject in Lajos Kassák's Viennese Collages and Poetry," at the Word and Image in 19th-20th-Century Art conference, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary, September 20-21, 2009.
Jun 2009
Heather Parsons, Ph.D. candidate in art history, presented a paper, "Marsilio Ficino and Renaissance 'Monstrosity': Depraved Soul or 'Fantastical' Imagination?" at the International Society for Neoplatonic Studies (ISNS) Conference, Kraków, Poland, June 18-21, 2009.
Apr 2009
Alissa Walls Mazow, Ph.D. candidate in art history received a Creative Achievement Award. She is a Ph.D. candidate in art history who has distinguished herself as a scholar and a teacher. Her dissertation, "Plantae, Animalia, Fungi: Transformations of Natural History in Contemporary American Art," investigates the ways in which contemporary artists employ (and sometimes critique) imagery from 18th and 19th century natural history. While many other graduate students at her stage of training have not yet published, two of Alissa's articles on modern art and architecture have already appeared in periodicals. Not surprisingly, she has been the recipient of many awards and fellowships, including a Penn State Alumni Dissertation Award (for the 2008-2009 year), a 2007 Graduate Student Summer Residency in the Institute for Arts and Humanities, and the nationally competitive Smithsonian Institution Predoctoral Fellowship at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, which has allowed her to study at the Smithsonian in residence this spring. Alissa has presented papers at many prestigious and competitive conferences and symposia as well including the American Studies Association. Alissa also excels as a pedagogue--she is an invaluable TA, and received rave reviews when she taught at Bucknell University for a semester as a visiting instructor last year.
Apr 2009
Daniel Haxall, Ph.D. candidate in art history, presented a paper, "Clement Greenberg's Pastoral Mood: The New York School and the Bucolic Tradition," in the symposium Clement Greenberg at 100: Looking Back at Modern Art, at Harvard University, April 3-4, 2009.
Mar 2009
Kimberly Ivancovich, Ph.D. candidate in art history, presented a paper, "The Triumph of Flemish Art in Siena:  The Survival of an Artistic Community after the Sienese Defeat of 1555," at the Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America, Los Angeles, California, March 19-21.
Mar 2009
Kristin Dean, Ph.D. candidate in art history, presented a paper, "Modern. Factory. Home.:  Architectural Form and the Politics of Poverty with the Movimiento de Ocupantes e Inquilinos Buenos Aires," at the Philadelphia Symposium on the History of Art, Philadelphia Museum of Art, March 29, 2009.  Her faculty advisor, Dr. Craig Zabel, will be introducing her.
Feb 2009
Natalie Harris, Ph.D. candidate in art history, presented a paper, "Titian's The Submersion of the Pharaoh's Army in the Red Sea as Monumental Breakthrough," at the 2009 Cleveland Symposium, February 20, 2009, sponsored by Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Museum of Art.
Feb 2009
Kelema Moses, Ph.D. candidate in art history presented a paper, "Photography and the Everyday: Imagining 'Paradise' in Territorial Hawaii," at the History of Art and Visual Studies Annual Graduate Symposium, Imag(in)ing Asia and the Pacific: Emerging Visualities and Art Perspectives, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., February 20-21, 2009.
Feb 2009
Carmen McCann, Ph.D. candidate in art history, presented a paper "Neither Alive, Nor Dead: Uncertainty in Théodore Géricault's Paintings of Severed Heads and Limbs" at the Cleveland Art History Graduate Symposium, Feb 20, 2009, sponsored by the Cleveland Museum of Art and Case Western Reserve University.