Faculty/Staff News

Dr. Sarah K. Rich
Mar 2017
Dr. Sarah K. Rich, presented “What’s Your Pleasure, Mr. Olitski?”  in a Workshop on “Rethinking Color Field:  Aspects of Painting and Criticism in the 1960s,” sponsored by History of Art and the Humanities Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, March 2, 2017.  The workshop featured Dr. Rich and critic Lloyd Wise (Artforum).
Dr. Zabel with his recent Ph.D. graduates, Dr. Laura Sivert, Dr. Kelema Moses, Dr. Tina Swisher, and Dr. Gretta Tritch Roman
Mar 2017
Dr Craig Zabel, Associate Professor & Head of the Department of Art History, will be presenting two invited lectures, “The American Skyscraper:  From the Emerald City of Oz to Glass Towers of the 1950s,” and “Frank Lloyd Wright and Interior Space:  Chicago’s Rookery Building and the Oak Park Home & Studio,” at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, March 9-10, 2017 .
Mar 2017
Dr. Catherine Kupiec, Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History, is co-organizing a three-session panel, titled “Della Robbia and Beyond: Glazed Terracotta Sculpture of the Italian Renaissance,” and as part of this she will give a paper, titled “Luca della Robbia: A Portrait of the Artist as Inventor” at the Renaissance Society of America Annual Conference, Chicago, March 29-April 1, 2017.  
Carolyn Lucarelli
Mar 2017
Carolyn Lucarelli, Curator of Visual Resources, Dept. of Art History, will be the Moderator for the session on “Cross-Campus Collaboration Case Studies,” at Unbridled Opportunities, the 34th Annual Conference of the Visual Resources Association, Louisville, Kentucky, March 29-April 1, 2017. 
Feb 2017
Dr. Denise Costanzo, assistant professor of architecture & art history, presents a lecture “Building the Pax Americana: Postwar Architects, Rome and the Fascist Legacy" in Projecting Americanism Abroad: Italy in the Cold War, at the American Academy in Rome, February 27-28, 2017.
Dr. Anthony Cutler
Feb 2017
Dr. Anthony Cutler, Evan Pugh University Professor of Art History, presents a paper, “Draining the Cup of God’s Wrath: On the Uses of Earthquakes in Tenth-Century Constantinople,” at the Annual Conference of the College Art Association, New York, N.Y., February 15-18, 2017.
Dr. Sarah K. Rich
Jan 2017
“Rocks, Bugs, Beakers, and Pee:  The Material of Artists Colors”                Sarah K. Rich | Art History Shockingly, few art historians today understand how dyes and pigments have been produced in the past, and in general we have lost touch with the ways in which the material substrate of color has influenced the meaning of art. This talk will briefly demonstrate the importance of understanding historical pigments and dyes from a material perspective, and will explore possibilities for fruitful intersections between historical and forensic approaches to color   The Millennium Café is held every Tuesday @ 10:00 in the 3rd floor Café Commons of the Millennium Science Complex.  Stop by for freshly brewed science & coffee.   ***Common Vision Workshop:  Imaging in the Millennium Science Complex  More info here.  
Nancy  Locke
Jan 2017
Art History Professor Uses Impressionism to Teach Med Students about Communication Post Date:  Friday, January 20, 2017 What does Impressionist painting have to do with the practice of medicine? More than you might think, according to Nancy Locke, associate professor of art history. For the past two years, she has been a presenter in the course “Impressionism and the Art of Communication,” a humanities course offered to fourth-year medical students enrolled at the University Park Regional Campus of the Penn State College of Medicine. “The idea is to improve doctor-patient communications through activities structured around Impressionist paintings,” Locke explained. “The goal is to show medical students different ways to communicate with their patients.” Dr. Michael Flanagan, assistant dean for curriculum and student affairs at the College of Medicine’s University Park location, developed the course, Humanities 7970, because of his own interest in painting and communication. Medical students at Penn State are required to take a humanities class during their fourth year. This course was offered for the first time in January 2016. One class activity involves students painting a copy of a work not by looking at it, but by asking a partner short, close-ended questions about the painting. During the four-week course, the students paint original works that will be exhibited on January 26, during their final class session. A public exhibition of the paintings will take place in the Borland Project Space in April 2017. “In my lectures, I discussed the idea of structure versus freedom. For example, what were audience expectations in the 19th century? Why was Impressionism controversial?” said Locke. “Art can make people see their lives differently. This course wants to help medical students think about communication as more nuanced, and to help them see that doctors should be open to discussions with their patients and not just jump to conclusions.” According to Locke, it’s important for doctors to engage with the humanities. “Doctors will see people regularly with certain problems. But a painting can continue to be challenging, and there are always new questions to ask. This class opens up a different way of thinking—it opens a door.”  Image: Charles Yoo based his impressionist art assignment on a photograph he carried on his phone. Yoo was part of a group of Penn State Medical School students who participated in Humanities 7970: Impressionism and the Art of Communication in January 2016. Photo by Patrick Mansell.  

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